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Object 6

Penicillium vulpinum MUCL 38790 (phase 1-2-3)
Penicillium crustosum MUCL 43437
Armillaria sp. MUCL 57008
Collections of micro-organisms

BCCM/BELSPO



 

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Penicillium vulpinum
MUCL 38790
Cultures from one to three weeks old on PDA (potato dextrose agar) medium
Mycothèque de l’Université catholique de Louvain (BCCM/MUCL)
Belgian Co-ordinated Collections of Micro-organisms (BCCM)

 

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Penicillium crustosum
MUCL 43437

Culture on PDA (potato dextrose agar) medium
Mycothèque de l’Université catholique de Louvain (BCCM/MUCL)
Belgian Co-ordinated Collections of Micro-organisms (BCCM)

 

The genus Penicillium, here represented by Penicillium vulpinum (top)and P. crustosum (bottom), classifies moulds of the Penicilli group, whose members include species that have played important roles for humans; the species Penicillium notatum lead to the discovery of the antibiotic penicillin in 1928, which saved millions of lives, and the species Penicillium roqueforti is a mould essential for the production of Roquefort cheese. It is a very diverse group, with sometimes impressive morphologies and colours.

The mycothèque de l’Université catholique de Louvain (MUCL) is one of the most important fungal culture collections in the world: more than 30 000 living strains, representing more than 4 000 species and 1 200 genera, from the research of scientists of the laboratory and their missions around the world, as well as deposits by external researchers or by industry.
http://bccm.belspo.be/about-us/bccm-mucl

 

 

Armillaria sp. MUCL 57008
Culture on MA2 (malt agar 2%) medium
Mycothèque de l’Université catholique de Louvain (BCCM/MUCL)
Belgian Co-ordinated Collections of Micro-organisms (BCCM)

 

Mushroom, in its reproductive phase (carpophore)

Mushroom, in its sterile phase,
mycelial, with rhizomorphs

 

Armillaria, here represented by Armillaria heimii, belong to the lamellate mushrooms (Agaricales). They have the particularity of forming structures called rhizomorphs, small cords that extend into the soil in search of a host tree, and that transport for example water. Fungi of the genus Armillaria play an important ecological role in the natural environment; they are important pathogens for trees of our forests, contributing to the recycling of wood and therefore to the carbon cycle.

A Canadian Armillaria specimen of the species A. solidipes (syn. A. ostoyae) is among the largest living organisms on earth with a size of about nine km2. Its age is estimated to 2 400 years and its weight to 600 tons.

 

 

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